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Temporary Exhibits

Ecologies of Resistance by DesertArt LAB

End Date: Tuesday, May 1, 2018

Samples from desert reclamation project

Samples from DesertArt LAB Pueblo Colorado reclamation project.

Ecologies of Resistance illustrates the artistic process of the DesertArt LAB collaborative’s site-specific ecological installation in the high desert of southern Colorado, through the use of artifacts, archival materials, and botanical samples. The collaborative is transforming a plot of blighted land into a thriving dryland ecosystem that also serves as an edible native landscape. Informed by social sculpture, the collaborative believes artists have the ability to altruistically transform and shape their environments and society. Re-growing ecologies in community space allows for the revitalization of ecological practice and a reimagining of an indigenous dryland cosmology and aesthetic.

About DesertArt LAB: 

April Bojorquez has worked in the museum field nationally/internationally as an educator, curator, and researcher. She is based in the San Francisco area and Southern Colorado. Bojorquez is fellow of the Smithsonian Institution’s Latino Museum Studies Program. She is a former faculty of American Ethnic Studies and assistant curator at the Marianna Kistler Beach Museum at Kansas State University.

 

Matt Garcia’s artistic practice investigates ecology, its relationship to knowledge systems and how media can connect communities to a reclaiming or re-imagining of lost epistemology. Garcia is an assistant professor of Art and Design at Dominican University of California. Garcia was formerly an assistant professor of Digital/Experimental Media in the Department of Art at Kansas State University. Garcia’s work has been presented nationally and internationally at venues such as: Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts (Paris, France).

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Cross Currents: China Exports and the World Responds

End Date: Saturday, March 3, 2018

Many things we use every day, from coffee mugs to iPhones, come from China.  The pattern began more than 2,000 years ago, when the Han dynasty promoted the "Silk Road" through central Asia, and the first porcelain objects arrived in Europe in 1338.  For almost two centures afterwards porcelain was a rarity, owned mostly by kings and high nobles.  Once Portuguese ships reached China in the early 1500s, it was suddenly possible to transport large quantities of Chinese ceramics directly to the West.  In the early 1700s the Chinese reorganized their porcelain production to cater to Western demand.  This exhibition highlights that history and its impact on cultural dynamics spanning hundreds of years and featuring dozens of ceramics from around the world in exploring this phenomenon.

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Last Supper

End Date: Saturday, March 31, 2018

Last Supper by C. Maxx Stevens

Last Supper exhibition still by C. Maxx Stevens

 

Last Supper by C.Maxx Stevens, Seminole/Mvskoke, is a conceptual installation pointing to the negative effect of contemporary diets, and the devastating effect of diabetes throughout native nations. Stevens’ builds a visual narrative based on private and public memories and experiences. The exhibition Last Supper creates a larger social awareness of the epidemic and its dilemma in all of the United States: one out of every six native people will develop diabetes or be affected by the disease. The mixed media installation includes Stevens’ family archives and testimony about the disease and its impact on traditional values and the drastic evolution of diet as well as economy.

C.Maxx Stevens is an Installation artist and Seminole/Mvskoke Nation from the Oklahoma Region. Her art is based on memories of family and culture expressed in three dimensional environments using materials, objects, and technology to build a visual narrative.  She is currently an Assistant Professor of Art at the University of Colorado in Boulder, Colorado serving as the Foundation Arts Director in the Art and Art History Department. C.Maxx has been a recipient of many awards and honors such as 2014 Art Matters Grant in New York, New York, 2005 Eiteljorge Fellowship Award. She has exhibited at the Smithsonian American Indian Museum Heye Center in New York City, New York; C. N. Gorman Museum, University of California at Davis, Davis, California; Eiteljorge Museum of Indian Art, Indianapolis, Indiana; Museum of Arts and Crafts, New York, New York; Center for Contemporary Arts, Santa Fe, New Mexico; Institute of American Indian Arts Museum, Santa Fe, New Mexico; Gordon Snelgrove Gallery, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; The Montana Museum of Art and Culture, Missoula, Montana; Boise Art Museum, Boise, Montana; and  White Mountain Academy Gallery, Elliot Lake, Ontario, Canada to name a few.

Last Supper is presented in partnership with the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts and will be on display through March 31, 2018,  a reception and gallery talk withC. Maxx Stevens will take place Friday, March 2, from 6 – 7:30 at the Maxwell Museum. The event is free and open to all.

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No Hate, No Fear: Responses to the Presidential Ban on Refugees and Immigrants

End Date: Saturday, March 3, 2018

(detail) Woman's Oud, mid-20th century, Maxwell Museum of Anthropology Collection

 

 

The title of this small but important exhibition is taken from a common refrain chanted at recent protests happening around the country: “No Hate, No Fear, immigrants (or “refugees”) are welcome here!”  The protests were a response to the executive ban of immigrants and refugees from Iraq, Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen. The protests reflect both a long history of Americans resisting government decisions they find objectionable (starting with the Boston Tea Party of 1773), and the power of social media to unite groups with a common purpose.

In this exhibition, which features both musical instruments from the countries singled out in the original ban and coverage of the protests at airports against the ban, we encourage visitors to contemplate the implications of the ban, as it continues to be debated, litigated, and revised.

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Entering Standing Rock: the Protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline

End Date: Saturday, March 10, 2018

Standing Rock poster, Defend the Sacred, by Jon Charley

Image (detail) Jon Charley "Defend the Sacred"

Native Americans have been resisting colonial and American government impositions since the arrival of colonists in the Americas during the 15th century. Opposition includes events as diverse as the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 and the founding of the American Indian Movement (AIM) in 1968.  The current protest at the Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota against the Dakota Access Pipeline (NoDAPL) is utilizing new strategies, technologies, media, and allies.

The NoDAPL protest began in response to a proposal to build a 1,172 mile long pipeline crossing multiple states, communities, farms, fragile wildlife habitats, and tribal lands. The protest has involved members of more than 100 indigenous tribes as well as non-tribal citizens.

The exhibition features photographs, posters, film, music, news reporting and other works by artists, journalists and activists who have supported or participated and offers a glimpse into life at the  camp  and shows how artists and protestors use social media to spread the message of protest.

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