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Temporary Exhibits

Cross Currents: China Exports and the World Responds

End Date: Saturday, March 3, 2018

Many things we use every day, from coffee mugs to iPhones, come from China.  The pattern began more than 2,000 years ago, when the Han dynasty promoted the "Silk Road" through central Asia, and the first porcelain objects arrived in Europe in 1338.  For almost two centures afterwards porcelain was a rarity, owned mostly by kings and high nobles.  Once Portuguese ships reached China in the early 1500s, it was suddenly possible to transport large quantities of Chinese ceramics directly to the West.  In the early 1700s the Chinese reorganized their porcelain production to cater to Western demand.  This exhibition highlights that history and its impact on cultural dynamics spanning hundreds of years and featuring dozens of ceramics from around the world in exploring this phenomenon.

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No Hate, No Fear: Responses to the Presidential Ban on Refugees and Immigrants

End Date: Saturday, March 3, 2018

(detail) Woman's Oud, mid-20th century, Maxwell Museum of Anthropology Collection

 

 

The title of this small but important exhibition is taken from a common refrain chanted at recent protests happening around the country: “No Hate, No Fear, immigrants (or “refugees”) are welcome here!”  The protests were a response to the executive ban of immigrants and refugees from Iraq, Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen. The protests reflect both a long history of Americans resisting government decisions they find objectionable (starting with the Boston Tea Party of 1773), and the power of social media to unite groups with a common purpose.

In this exhibition, which features both musical instruments from the countries singled out in the original ban and coverage of the protests at airports against the ban, we encourage visitors to contemplate the implications of the ban, as it continues to be debated, litigated, and revised.

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Entering Standing Rock: the Protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline

End Date: Saturday, March 10, 2018

Standing Rock poster, Defend the Sacred, by Jon Charley

Image (detail) Jon Charley "Defend the Sacred"

Native Americans have been resisting colonial and American government impositions since the arrival of colonists in the Americas during the 15th century. Opposition includes events as diverse as the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 and the founding of the American Indian Movement (AIM) in 1968.  The current protest at the Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota against the Dakota Access Pipeline (NoDAPL) is utilizing new strategies, technologies, media, and allies.

The NoDAPL protest began in response to a proposal to build a 1,172 mile long pipeline crossing multiple states, communities, farms, fragile wildlife habitats, and tribal lands. The protest has involved members of more than 100 indigenous tribes as well as non-tribal citizens.

The exhibition features photographs, posters, film, music, news reporting and other works by artists, journalists and activists who have supported or participated and offers a glimpse into life at the  camp  and shows how artists and protestors use social media to spread the message of protest.

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