Skip to content Skip to navigation

Temporary Exhibits

Intertwined: The Mexican Wolf, the People and the Land

End Date: Saturday, July 27, 2019

Mexican wolf image by Jenna Miller/Cronkite News 2018

A Mexican Wolf that has just been collared for purposes of tracking, Arizona, February 2018.  Image: Jenna Miller/Cronkite News

Perhaps no other animal in North America has been as controversial as the gray wolf, which once numbered in the millions on this continent. Massive reductions of wolf populations began with the arrival of European settlers. Today, wolves continue to be central in debates about the American ecosystem. Preservationists and environmentalists usually argue for their protection and renewal, while ranchers and their advocates often argue for reduction if not their elimination. The exhibition investigates the biology and history of the Mexican Wolf, focusing on the human/wolf relationship.

view more

Return to Diné Bikéyah: The 150th Anniversary of the Signing of the Navajo Peace Treaty

End Date: Sunday, June 30, 2019

Picture of Chief Manuelito and unidentified Diné man

Unidentified Diné Man and Manuelito,

New Mexico Territory, ca. 1867

By Nicholas Brown & Son

Diné, meaning “The People,” is how the Navajo refer to themselves.  The Diné comprise the largest Indigenous nation in North America. Diné Bikéyah, also known as The Navajo Nation, stretches across portions of Utah, Arizona, and New Mexico; at more than 27,000 square miles, it is larger than 10 of the U.S. States.

In 1598 the founding of the Spanish colony of New Mexico changed the lives of the Diné forever, marking the beginning of the often-violent changes brought by settler colonialism. In 1848 the U.S. Army arrived in New Mexico territory, and in 1864 the U.S. government forcibly removed the Diné from their homeland to an impoverished tract of land known as the Bosque Redondo, in eastern New Mexico. This exhibition observes the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Navajo Peace Treaty, which took place on June 1, 1868, after the Diné insisted on being allowed to return home. The Diné are the only Native Nation to successfully use a treaty to retain their homeland.

 

view more